April 14, 2015

Effects of Heat Wave

Fire
Fire in Texas
Source


A heat wave is a prolonged period of excessively hot weather, which may be accompanied by high humidity, or low humidity, especially in oceanic climate countries. While definitions vary, a heat wave is measured relative to the usual weather in the area and relative to normal temperatures for the season. Temperatures that people from a hotter climate consider normal can be termed a heat wave in a cooler area if they are outside the normal climate pattern for that area.

The term is applied both to routine weather variations and to extraordinary spells of heat which may occur only once a century. Severe heat waves have caused catastrophic crop failures, thousands of deaths from hyperthermia, and widespread power outages due to increased use of air conditioning. A heat wave is considered extreme weather, and a danger because heat and sunlight may overheat the human body.

Heat waves often lead to electricity spikes due to increased air conditioning use, which can create power outages, exacerbating the problem. If a heat wave occurs during a drought, which dries out vegetation, it can contribute to bushfires and wildfires. Heat waves can and do cause roads and highways to buckle and melt, water lines to burst, and power transformers to detonate, causing fires.


Fire
Huge fire in California
Source


Fire
Heat wave
Source

Fire in Chile
Fire in Chile
Source

Big fire of forests in Texas
Big fire of forests in Texas
Source

Heat wave
Heat wave
Source

Fire in Australia
Fire in Australia
Source
Post a Comment